Category Archives: architecture

The Resonant Chamber: a ceiling that dynamically adapts to the sound of performances in concert halls.

Resonant Chamber is an interior envelope system that deploys the principles of rigid origami to transform the acoustic environment through dynamic spatial, material and electro-acoustic technologies. Our aim is to develop a soundsphere able to adjust its properties in response to changing sonic conditions, altering the sound of a space during performance and creating an instrument at the scale of architecture, flexible enough that it might be capable of being played. The project is developed through three streams of iterative research and development in both computational testing and full-scale prototype installation: Dynamic Surface Geometries; Performative Material Systems; and Variable Actuation and Response. Resonant Chamber is funded through the 2011 Research through Making Grant, U-M Office of the Vice President for Research, 2011 Small Projects Grant, U-M Center for Wireless Integrated Microsystems, Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada Research Creation Grant.
SO innovative! SO interesting

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A monument to Chinese consumer culture

 

My friend posted this link from Architizer and I found it so fascinating the lengths and obsession the Chinese will succumb to in the sake of their shopping malls, fake products, and materialistic obsession. As I as studying abroad last semester my peer and I always wondered how on earth there would be enough people to fill these shopping malls because while in the states we have a variety of grocery stores, schools, public parks, libraries, clinics, etc- you can only find a mall every once in awhile. But in China its a different story. Every inch of China seems to be covered in malls- not in the simplest forms of retail shops, but large scale malls just like the one below. HOW do they find that many people to buy stuff and if they do WHERE do they put everything?!

Check out the project below and let me know what you think.

 

9,600,000 square feet. 2,350 retails spaces. Spraying fountains, amusement park rides, video game arcades, replicas of international monuments, including the Arc de Triomph, the bell tower of St. Mark’s in Venice, and a 1.3-mile canal with gondolas. This is the New South China Mall in Dongguan, China, a sprawling, colorful complex that has been poised as the one-stop consumption center of the future since its opening in 2005. But in the words and images of photographer Matthew Niederhauser, the mall is an “unabatedly empty temple to consumerism.” Of its 2,350 retail spaces, only 47 are occupied, and the top floors remain unfinished, sitting in settled dust, inhabited almost exclusively by an eerie coterie of dismembered mannequins.

The image, however, is more bleak than sublime. The mall’s manager and his team of a dozen or so operators are clinging to hope in the form of a government-sponsored investor, who refuses to let the project succumb to bankruptcy. But it remains to be seen whether or not China can pump life into this massive consumerist monument, built over 220 acres of farmland with barely any connection to the populated provinces of Shenzhen and Guangzhou nearby.

In an upcoming Oscar-nominated film about the mall by Sam Green, mall consultant Ted deSwart hailed the hulking complex—the product of a billionaire’s myopic vision—as an illustration of “how fast China is not only catching up with the West but surpassing the West too.” The New South China Mall undoubtedly dwarfs its western predecessors, spanning twice the size of Minneapolis’ famed Mall of America and appearing more like a condensed city akin to Las Vegas than a mere shopping destination. However, its ghostly interiors and empty walkways and escalators are a testament to China’s eagerness to fabricate superficial visions of grandeur with little to no regard to their context.

 

Winde Rienstra Hand Crafted Fashion + Architecture

amazing! check these out. Inspirational

Winde Rienstra, where fashion meets art. The public was blown away by Winde’s handcrafted designs and this collection was definitely my favourite as well. I can’t wait to see more from this designer!

see you soon,

A

R(air)ified symposium

New technologies and design methodologies will allow new forms, materials and strategies to emerge in support of renewed interests in creating and conditioning of environments. This symposium will consider the changing roles of atmospheres itself in architecture and how the design, distribution, filtration, and conditioning of air effects and affects space.

Speakers include: Gail Peter borden, an te Liu, Phillips rahm, Marcos Sanchez, Doris sung, warren techentin, Tom wiscombe

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AirBeam

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Airbeam computational membrane (done with roland snoo & Tom Wiscombe

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Before and After Shots via curbly

I know I don’t usually post this kind of stuff but my guilty love for extreme makeover just kicked in. Check out this amazing renovation! TOO awesome. Redesigned by Adams & Duke. Design is power- can you image the impact of lifestyle?

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WABAMM!

installations

Some of my latest interests in Installations.

‘EXOtique’ is the result of a one week, low-budget design progress through fabrication installation at the Ball State’s College of Architecture. One day was devoted to design, one day of Modeling in Rhino / Grasshopper and materials testing, and three shared days of fabrication, assembly, and installation with help from the students of the University.

This project explores the potential application of electro-active polymer (EAP) at an architectural scale. EAP offers a new relationship to built space through its unique combination of qualities. It is an ultra-lightweight, flexible material with the ability to change shape without the need for mechanical actuators. EAP is a polymer actuator that converts electrical power into mechanical force. In principle it consists of a thin layer of very elastic acrylic tape sandwiched between two electrodes. Once the voltage in the range of several kilovolts is applied between the electrodes, the polymer changes its shape in two ways. First, due to the attraction of the opposing charges, the film is squeezed in the thickness direction (up to 380%), secondly, the repelling forces between equal charges on both electrodes result in a linear expansion of the film. As a result, after actuation the film becomes thinner and its surface area increases. If the supportive frame is flexible, due to the initial pre-stretching of the acrylic film, the frame bends. After application of voltage, the material expands, and the component flattens out.

“‘Adaptive fa[CA]de’ is a manifestation of how naturally designed systems can potentially inspire a new type of adaptive, programmable architecture. It explores a wide spectrum of functional possibilities and performative characteristics of Cellular Automata (CA). CA are bottom-up algorithms and a great example of ‘hidden’, low-level intelligence found in several emergent and often complex, natural formations. ‘Adaptive fa[CA]de’ is an endeavour to formulate a surface based on simple CA rules that constantly alters its pattern by tilting each panel on the grid to seven possible angles.”

interesting self portraits

UK-based studio random international has developed the interactive light installation ‘swarm study/iii’ on special commission of london’s victoria and albert museum and in association with the carpenters workshop gallery. the piece overhangs the staircase adjoining the V&A’s architecture and ceramics galleries, where it will remain for three years. ‘swarm study/iii’ consists of four cubic forms suspended from the ceiling, each composed of a grid of illuminated brass rods. a camera placed next to the piece tracks visitor movement, causing the lights of the installation to flicker, brighten, and dim in response. ‘though apparently inanimate,’ the V&A notes, ”swarm study/iii’ translates collective behavioral patterns found in nature into moving light. the installation is brought to life by visitors’ activity, engaging them with both the swarm itself and the surround space of the museum.’

Algae exhibition. part of ecologic master plan for algae city masterplan

Prickly Pear is an installation proposal for the work of Nicola Formichetti designed by Barker Freeman Design Office that proposes an immersive sensory environment with changing color tones that can correspond to changing music, body movement, or merchandise within the space. Our concept was to insert an enveloping volume of stretchy translucent netting that would capture and reflect the shifting light spectrum emitted from the system of custom LED fixtures. The lighting could be programmed on a pre-set script or it could be set to respond to environmental changes

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Hello from Beautiful Seoul!

Sorry i haven’t been posting in awhile with all things going on its been a bit hard to have the time to sit down and collect my thoughts. All thoughts that Ive posted online goes on to the USC AAU blog So if you have time, check it out and check out my classmates stuff too! They’re really great essays on the things we have been experiencing/collecting/learning while here in Asia. So far Seoul has been the only place that I haven’t gone to amongst all the places that i’ve listed and its been pretty great taking a break from translating and falling back into the routine of discovering new things like I was in Europe. The culture here is just so amazing- and compared to China I can definitely say that Korea’s a bit cleaner, safer, and even fashion sense is in my opinion a bit better. Maybe I’m being biased because Seoul for the past week has had California weather. Regardless I am definitely adding Seoul to my places to live list. (Amongt which include Brussels, Barcelona, Berlin, and Manhattan. ) I will be posting pictures soon so please watch for them! But for now OMA has been a lingering presence in our stay here in Asia. Seems like everywhere we go OMA seems to have made an impression. So this only makes me marvel Rem even more! My friend showed me today OMA’s Prada catwalk SS 2012. I literally got the heeby jeebies from the first glance. Take a look and see what you think.

OMA just has a way of designing the most complicated situations with the most simple structures don’t they? Power in simplicity people. Its all about the simplicity of things.

Prada men's SS 2012 catwalk show

Prada’s spring/summer men’s catwalk show, designed by AMO, took place on June 19th 2011 at Milan fashion week. AMO’s concept for the show is to organise the audience as a “perfect field”: 600 visitors sit on individual blue foam blocks distributed over a 1.5 x 1.5 meter grid spread through the entire hall.

Models flow through the highly-organized audience, following multiple choreographed routes that allow maximum visibility.

The field is a commentary on the audience: from indeterminate crowd to regimented, possibly anxious, isolated individuals. Each guest becomes a challenge for the new fashion; each confrontation becomes highly personal…

The field is based on a zero degree approach: a spatial system as opposed to an elaborated design.

Artificial grass covers the floor.

Light is provided by 16 panels of 30 PAR lights each, vaguely resembling stadium lighting systems.

The set up refers to the imagery of a geometric outdoors; the audience participates in a perfectly organized picnic.

AMO’s concept for the show is to organise the audience as a “perfect field”: 600 visitors sit on individual blue foam blocks distributed over a 1.5 x 1.5 meter grid spread through the entire hall.

Models flow through the highly-organized audience, following multiple choreographed routes that allow maximum visibility.

The field is a commentary on the audience: from indeterminate crowd to regimented, possibly anxious, isolated individuals. Each guest becomes a challenge for the new fashion; each confrontation becomes highly personal…

The field is based on a zero degree approach: a spatial system as opposed to an elaborated design.

Artificial grass covers the floor.

Light is provided by 16 panels of 30 PAR lights each, vaguely resembling stadium lighting systems.

The set up refers to the imagery of a geometric outdoors; the audience participates in a perfectly organized picnic…

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Beginnings of AAU

Ni Hao Readers and welcome to the Asia portion of this blog. About three weeks ago I arrived in Hong kong for the USC Asia Architecture & Urbanism Study abroad program and since then I’ve visited places like Guangzhou, ZhuHai, ZhongShan, Shenzhen, and the list goes on. Its only been about 3 weeks but its seems like its been forever.

Here is the AAU itinerary

AAU Schedule
HK: Aug. 30th – Sept. 2nd
Shenzhen: Sept. 3rd – Sept. 6th
Dongguan, Guangzhou, Foshan, Zhonshan, Zhuhai, Macau: Sept. 7th – Sept. 16
HK: Sept. 17th – Sept. 18th.
Seoul: Sept. 19th – Sept. 30th
Taiwan: Oct. 1st – Oct. 7th
Beijing: Oct. 8th, 9th – Oct. 15th
Shanghai: Oct. 16th – Dec. 7th
Tokyo: Dec. 8th – Dec. 10th
Kyoto: Dec. 11th – Dec. 14th

I haven’t quite edited my photos because we’ve been traveling so much and China is super annoying with the whole blog/facebook deal that its been hard to blog. But please check out our posts on the USC AAU wordpress site

http://uscaau.wordpress.com/

My entry is on there too (Urban Schizophrenia)

Enjoy! Will be posting soon

A

Ant Hills:complex morphology

absolutely blown out of the water. How AMAZING is that!

A

drawing influences

Charette week is only inches away and this semester we’re working on a library project for topic studios. I’ve been looking through some pretty fascinating projects and here are some images that really got me thinking about the design of my building. Although it doesn’t really seem traditional to think so but my studio professor says that design is never truly original.All designs have been done and its always about reinterpretation.  I suppose I agree, although I would like to say that all my ideas are original but truly my best moments of creativity come at the most random moments and mostly in a state of panic. I suppose architects just work best on deadlines.

enjoy the images!

*projects: Raiffeisen bank in Zurich and the HOlocaust museum by belzberg architects

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The goal of this white space-agey environment is to break down the physical and emotional barriers between customers and staff. Stern tellers and three-piece-suited bankers behind high counters and glass walls, and accessible only through little windows like jailbirds — these are things of the past.